Woods Hole


By Beth Liles

Two undergraduates on the MBL campus are excitedly preparing to present talks on their summer research tomorrow: Diara Townes and Victoria Morgan, both students in the Woods Hole Partnership Education Program (PEP).

Now in its second year, PEP immerses undergraduates in the rich scientific and academic culture of the Woods Hole research community, and introduces them to leaders and colleagues in their fields of interest. Sixteen PEP students are being mentored in several Woods Hole institutions this summer, including Townes, who is from Hampton University, and Morgan, from Cornell.

PEP student Diara Townes works with MBL veterinarian Amy Hancock in the Marine Resources Center. Photo by Tom Kleindinst

PEP student Diara Townes works with MBL veterinarian Amy Hancock in the Marine Resources Center. Photo by Tom Kleindinst

“This has been the most exciting summer in my undergraduate career,” says Townes. “Not only am I gaining exquisite research experience, but I am also making lasting friendships and amazing professional connections.”

Designed primarily for juniors and seniors interested in marine and environmental science, the PEP curriculum consists of a four-week course followed by six-to-eight week individual research projects. The students are presenting their research findings tomorrow, August 13, from 8:30 AM to 1 PM in the Tilley Conference Room, U.S. Geological Survey Woods Hole Science Center, 384 Woods Hole Road (Quissett Campus), Woods Hole.

MBL veterinarian Amy Hancock in the Marine Resources Center has been mentoring Townes. They are evaluating a new fish anesthetic on various ornamental species to observe its effects on the animals. Townes is also working with Kristy Owen at NOAA’s Woods Hole Science Aquarium. They are measuring dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in the facility’s three main reservoirs and six exhibit tanks to determine if there is a correlation between DO levels and the fish disease exophthalmia (“pop-eye”).

Morgan is working with Ecosystems Center scientist Jim Tang, testing the method to measure carbon dioxide emissions from soils and measuring stem respiration from the Center’s Harvard Forest field site. The project goal is to examine the climate change impact on ecosystems and the feedback of ecosystems to the climate.

Victoria Morgan places soil samples into an oven in order to get a dry measurement of the bulk density of the soil. Photo by Tom Kleindinst

Victoria Morgan places soil samples into an oven in order to get a dry measurement of the bulk density of the soil. Photo by Tom Kleindinst

“I’ve learned more about the oceans and climate change than I expected,” Morgan says. “I’ve met lots of wonderful people, and I’ve had experiences that will remain with me for years to come. I plan on spreading the good news to my fellow Cornellians: PEP is a wonderful program and I really want others to participate in it!”

PEP is a partnership between the University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES) and the Woods Hole Diversity Initiative, a multi-institutional effort to promote diversity in the Woods Hole science community. Members of the Diversity Initiative include NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC), Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USGS Woods Hole Science Center, SEA, the MBL, and Woods Hole Research Center.

The science institutions in Woods Hole are committed to building a diverse and inclusive community. People from all cultures and all backgrounds can feel welcome in Woods Hole, whether they are visiting, spending a season as students, or spending part or all of their careers working here. PEP is just one of many Woods Hole Diversity Committee efforts. To learn more, go to http://www.woodsholediversity.org/

2010 PEP students and directors: Top Row:  Zachary Williams, George Liles (PEP Program coordinator, NEFSC), Delawrence Sykes, Alexander DeLeon, Nam Siu.  Row 2: Lucy Flores, Emily Motz, Christopher Cepero, Brian Redding, Ambrose Jearld (PEP Program director, NEFSC).  Row 3: Joniqua Howard, Lane Boyer, Melika Uter, Rachel Rochon, Victoria Morgan  Bottom Row: Angela Anorve, Delores Toledo, Anna-Mai Christmas, and Diara Townes. Photo by Sateesh Rogers

2010 PEP students and directors: Top Row: Zachary Williams, George Liles (PEP Program coordinator, NEFSC), Delawrence Sykes, Alexander DeLeon, Nam Siu. Row 2: Lucy Flores, Emily Motz, Christopher Cepero, Brian Redding, Ambrose Jearld (PEP Program director, NEFSC). Row 3: Joniqua Howard, Lane Boyer, Melika Uter, Rachel Rochon, Victoria Morgan Bottom Row: Angela Anorve, Delores Toledo, Anna-Mai Christmas, and Diara Townes. Photo by Sateesh Rogers

The 4th of July parade is one of the must-see events of a Woods Hole summer. If you missed this year’s parade, here are a few photos by MBL Club coordinator Daisy Glazebrook.

Students in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program at the MBL show their colors. The NSF-sponsored program is directed by Alan Mensinger of University of Minnesota, Duluth and Paul Malchow of University of Illinois, Chicago.

Students in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program at the MBL show their colors. The NSF-sponsored program is directed by Alan Mensinger of University of Minnesota, Duluth and Paul Malchow of University of Illinois, Chicago.

Course assistants from the Children’s School of Science and their walking volcano.

Course assistants from the Children’s School of Science and their walking volcano.

"Uncle Sam" (MBL Director and CEO Gary Borisy) leads the parade.

"Uncle Sam" (MBL Director and CEO Gary Borisy) leads the parade.

SPINES (Summer Program in Neuroscience, Ethics and Survival) participants on the march.

SPINES (Summer Program in Neuroscience, Ethics and Survival) participants on the march.

MBL Communications interns Daisy Glazebrook and Elizabeth Kelly refreshed parade-goers with watermelon slices.

MBL Communications interns Daisy Glazebrook and Elizabeth Kelly refreshed parade-goers with watermelon slices.

Denise LoydA grad student, a post-doc, and a visiting scientist walk into a lab. What happens? Well, better science! Better, that is, than for a group composed of all post-docs, or all grad students, or all scientists from the same institution, according to Denise Loyd (left), an assistant professor at MIT’s Sloan School of Management.

Loyd, who studies the effects of diversity in groups, presented her research last week in a talk sponsored by the Woods Hole Diversity Initiative.  Loyd provided evidence that the presence of diversity in a group strengthens discussions in which final group decisions are made. Groups in which a majority of members fall into one category (based on race, background, institution affiliation, etc.), while a minority fall into another, put more time and thought into their conclusions.

We might assume the benefits of diversity in groups are solely attributable to the unique perspectives of the minority members. However, Loyd’s research shows that the simple existence of diversity can alter group dynamics in such a way that brings out different, positive behaviors in majority members, such as showing greater openness to others’ ideas.

Loyd also emphasized the importance of seeking out the unique strengths of members who may have lower perceived status in a group, such as undergraduates working in a lab with graduate students and post-docs. Her talk will no doubt prove useful to Woods Hole scientists and other community members seeking to strengthen group efforts. It also might help explain why the peer-to-peer dynamic in the MBL’s courses—where students problem-solve real-world research problems alongside some of the world’s top scientists—is often so energizing and productive.

Loyd’s talk was part of a Woods Hole Diversity Initiative event series called  “Synergy and the Group; the Hidden Power of Diversity.” For more information on upcoming events, visit http://www.woodsholediversity.org/.

By Sarah Stanley

Renowned poet, playwright, and Simmons College professor Afaa Michael Weaver treated the Woods Hole community to a poetry reading on Friday for the village’s annual Juneteenth celebration. Weaver, a Baltimore native who spent several years working with his father and uncles in a factory before embarking on a remarkable literary career, read a number of poems to honor the June 19, 1865, implementation of the Emancipation Proclamation in Texas, over two years after it was signed into law. The anniversary of the law’s enforcement is now celebrated as Juneteenth, commemorating the national abolishment of slavery.

Afaa Michael Weaver performs a poetry reading for Woods Hole’s annual Juneteenth celebration. Photo by Sarah Stanley

Afaa Michael Weaver presents a poetry reading at Woods Hole’s annual Juneteenth celebration. Photo by Sarah Stanley

Surrounded by antique botanical prints, Weaver captivated the crowd gathered in the Meigs Room of Swope Conference Center. His selections showed his wide range as a poet, covering topics from childhood crushes to familial love, from personal growth to class and race. He opened, appropriately, with a poem called “Science,” in which his childhood self begs to be rescued from science class. He followed with thoughtful poems— many dedicated to various family members, friends, and acquaintances—that recalled experiences throughout his life. “Remember,” a particularly poignant poem written for his granddaughter, urges her repeatedly to alert him if he forgets to protect her:

If I forget to plug the sun,

let me know

If I forget to tame the sharks’ teeth,

let me know

If I forget to stop the tsunamis,

let me know

If I forget to tie up the bears,

let me know

If I forget to chase away the viruses,

let me know…

“[Poetry is] my way of legitimizing my life,” Weaver said in a Q&A after the reading. “It led me gradually to a realization of who I am spiritually and secularly.”

Scientists and other community members enjoyed Weaver’s readings before heading into the late afternoon sun for a barbeque on the lawn at the nearby NOAA Fisheries Service.

The event was organized by the Black History Month Committee, which includes members from the MBL, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Sea Education Association, USGS Science Center for Coastal and Marine Geology, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and Woods Hole Research Center. The committee celebrates and educates the Woods Hole community on African American history and culture.

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