Monitor news post


Collaborative marine science took a leap of global proportions on June 21, 2014. At carefully orchestrated times on that day, hundreds of scientists around the world collected ocean samples, using standardized protocols, as part of the first international Ocean Sampling Day (OSD). They were united by the goal of identifying the microbial communities in all the samples–no small task given that one drop of seawater contains about 20 million microbes.

This movie features MBL Associate Scientist Linda Amaral-Zettler, who took a lead role in OSD as a scientific adviser to the project’s European sponsor, MicroB3, and who actively sampled and helped coordinate sampling in the Azorean Islands. Building a knowledge base of marine microbes is critical for understanding the impact of global challenges to ocean health, such as a warming climate.

“Sampling is expensive,” Amaral-Zettler says. “The more we can leverage individual regional efforts and resources, the better we will be in protecting the ocean.”

As soon as they were collected, the samples were frozen and shipped to Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, Germany. The next step is to identify “who” are in the samples through DNA extraction and analysis.

OSD will take place again in 2015 and hopefully into the future, Amaral Zettler says, which would provide a long-term perspective on how marine microbial diversity changes over time. “We need to understand how things are changing in order to protect them.”

Akash Srivastava, a student in the Brown-MBL Graduate Program in Biological and Environmental Sciences, successfully defended his Ph.D. dissertation entitled “Transdifferentiation of Liver to Pancreas” on August 18 at Brown University. Srivastava, a student in the Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry Department (MCB) at Brown, conducted his research at the MBL’s Eugene Bell Center for Regenerative Biology and Tissue Engineering under the advisement of MBL Associate Scientist Marko Horb. His doctoral committee members also included Rich Freiman, Kristi Wharton, and Eric Morrow from the MCB Department.

Srivastava’s doctoral research helped to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in transdifferentiation of liver to pancreas in the frog Xenopus laevis. He identified a previously unknown role of a highly conserved beta-catenin inhibitor protein (Chibby) in transdifferentiation of liver to pancreas and in normal pancreas development. His research also provided a better understanding of the function of Wnt/beta catenin signaling in pancreas development. Funding for his research came from the Horb lab at with grant support from the National Institutes of Health.

After completing his final manuscripts, Srivastava plans to work as a validation consultant in the pharmaceutical industry.

Akash Srivastava defends his thesis at Brown University for his Ph.D. in the Brown-MBL Graduate Program.

Akash Srivastava defends his thesis at Brown University for his Ph.D. in the Brown-MBL Graduate Program.

Keating-at-OBFS-NML-meeting-9-2014-cropU.S. Representative Bill Keating visited Lillie Auditorium this morning to address members of the Organization of Biological Field Stations (OBFS) and the National Association of Marine Laboratories (NAML), who are holding a joint meeting at the MBL.

Keating remarked on the exponential advances in information technology that allow scientists to transmit data from field stations “instantly, accurately, and efficiently.” He also commended the two groups for collaborating. “Working jointly, with the information you gather, creates enormous opportunities” in the private sector as well as in environmental science, Keating said.

Keating represents the 9th district of Massachusetts, which includes Cape Cod and the islands. He was invited to the MBL by Sarah Oktay, president of OBFS and director of the UMass Boston Nantucket Field Station. MBL Senior Scientist Alan Kuzirian is the founding secretary/treasurer of NAML ( from 1990-2014).

Jerry Melillo, distinguished scientist at the MBL's Ecosystems Center, leads a panel discussion of the National Climate Assessment yesterday at the White House. Melillo is chairman of the advisory committee that prepared the assessment for interagency U.S. Global Change Research Program. Screen shot by Gina Hebert.

Jerry Melillo, Distinguished Scientist at the MBL’s Ecosystems Center, leads a panel discussion of the National Climate Assessment yesterday at the White House. Melillo is chairman of the National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee. Screen shot by Gina Hebert.

The major messages of the Third National Climate Assessment released yesterday — climate change is already here, its impacts are being felt in every U.S. region, it is caused by human activity, and it is not too late to take action — were discussed far and wide, in thousands of news articles and broadcasts across the nation. For scientists like the MBL’s Jerry Melillo who have spent decades documenting global climate change, this is a great leap forward. This White House infographic summarizes some of the major findings of the Assessment, and outlines national plans to prepare for climate change impacts, reduce carbon pollution, and lead international efforts to address global climate change. Melillo is chairman of the federal advisory committee that prepared the assessment for the interagency U.S. Global Change Research Program.

 

A whimsical, enlightening video about cuttlefish camouflage by Jacob Gindi, a senior and biology major at Brown University, appeared in The New York Times last week. Gindi had encountered live cuttlefish when he visited the MBL’s Marine Resources Center as a student in The Art and Science of Visual Perception, a Brown course co-taught by Roger Hanlon of the MBL and Mark Milloff of Rhode Island School of Design. Gindi then had a chance to make a CreatureCast video in Casey Dunn’s Invertebrate Zoology class at Brown. Inspired by Hanlon’s research, Gindi’s artful video about the cuttlefish’s amazingly adaptive skin can be enjoyed by marine biology-lovers of all ages.

“It is so gratifying to see science and art promoted at this national/international scale,” says Hanlon, an MBL senior scientist and professor in Brown’s Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department through the Brown-MBL Partnership and Graduate Program.

CreatureCast, a collaborative blog produced by members of the Dunn Lab, is supported by a National Science Foundation grant.

 

 

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