Monitor news post


Akash Srivastava, a student in the Brown-MBL Graduate Program in Biological and Environmental Sciences, successfully defended his Ph.D. dissertation entitled “Transdifferentiation of Liver to Pancreas” on August 18 at Brown University. Srivastava, a student in the Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry Department (MCB) at Brown, conducted his research at the MBL’s Eugene Bell Center for Regenerative Biology and Tissue Engineering under the advisement of MBL Associate Scientist Marko Horb. His doctoral committee members also included Rich Freiman, Kristi Wharton, and Eric Morrow from the MCB Department.

Srivastava’s doctoral research helped to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in transdifferentiation of liver to pancreas in the frog Xenopus laevis. He identified a previously unknown role of a highly conserved beta-catenin inhibitor protein (Chibby) in transdifferentiation of liver to pancreas and in normal pancreas development. His research also provided a better understanding of the function of Wnt/beta catenin signaling in pancreas development. Funding for his research came from the Horb lab at with grant support from the National Institutes of Health.

After completing his final manuscripts, Srivastava plans to work as a validation consultant in the pharmaceutical industry.

Akash Srivastava defends his thesis at Brown University for his Ph.D. in the Brown-MBL Graduate Program.

Akash Srivastava defends his thesis at Brown University for his Ph.D. in the Brown-MBL Graduate Program.

Keating-at-OBFS-NML-meeting-9-2014-cropU.S. Representative Bill Keating visited Lillie Auditorium this morning to address members of the Organization of Biological Field Stations (OBFS) and the National Association of Marine Laboratories (NAML), who are holding a joint meeting at the MBL.

Keating remarked on the exponential advances in information technology that allow scientists to transmit data from field stations “instantly, accurately, and efficiently.” He also commended the two groups for collaborating. “Working jointly, with the information you gather, creates enormous opportunities” in the private sector as well as in environmental science, Keating said.

Keating represents the 9th district of Massachusetts, which includes Cape Cod and the islands. He was invited to the MBL by Sarah Oktay, president of OBFS and director of the UMass Boston Nantucket Field Station. MBL Senior Scientist Alan Kuzirian is the founding secretary/treasurer of NAML ( from 1990-2014).

Jerry Melillo, distinguished scientist at the MBL's Ecosystems Center, leads a panel discussion of the National Climate Assessment yesterday at the White House. Melillo is chairman of the advisory committee that prepared the assessment for interagency U.S. Global Change Research Program. Screen shot by Gina Hebert.

Jerry Melillo, Distinguished Scientist at the MBL’s Ecosystems Center, leads a panel discussion of the National Climate Assessment yesterday at the White House. Melillo is chairman of the National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee. Screen shot by Gina Hebert.

The major messages of the Third National Climate Assessment released yesterday — climate change is already here, its impacts are being felt in every U.S. region, it is caused by human activity, and it is not too late to take action — were discussed far and wide, in thousands of news articles and broadcasts across the nation. For scientists like the MBL’s Jerry Melillo who have spent decades documenting global climate change, this is a great leap forward. This White House infographic summarizes some of the major findings of the Assessment, and outlines national plans to prepare for climate change impacts, reduce carbon pollution, and lead international efforts to address global climate change. Melillo is chairman of the federal advisory committee that prepared the assessment for the interagency U.S. Global Change Research Program.

 

A whimsical, enlightening video about cuttlefish camouflage by Jacob Gindi, a senior and biology major at Brown University, appeared in The New York Times last week. Gindi had encountered live cuttlefish when he visited the MBL’s Marine Resources Center as a student in The Art and Science of Visual Perception, a Brown course co-taught by Roger Hanlon of the MBL and Mark Milloff of Rhode Island School of Design. Gindi then had a chance to make a CreatureCast video in Casey Dunn’s Invertebrate Zoology class at Brown. Inspired by Hanlon’s research, Gindi’s artful video about the cuttlefish’s amazingly adaptive skin can be enjoyed by marine biology-lovers of all ages.

“It is so gratifying to see science and art promoted at this national/international scale,” says Hanlon, an MBL senior scientist and professor in Brown’s Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department through the Brown-MBL Partnership and Graduate Program.

CreatureCast, a collaborative blog produced by members of the Dunn Lab, is supported by a National Science Foundation grant.

 

 

By Jane Tucker
Senior Research Assistant, MBL Ecosystems Center

Note: MBL senior scientist Anne Giblin was recently named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science. This post by Jane Tucker was originally published on The TIDE Project blog, edited by MBL assistant research scientist David S. Johnson.

Anne Giblin’s recent election as an AAAS Fellow is well deserved, and if there were a companion award for outstanding achievements in kindness, generosity, and commitment to others, she would rightfully be awarded that, too. I have had the privilege of working closely with Anne for over 20 years at the MBL Ecosystems Center, and I should know.

From left, Jane Tucker, Anne Giblin, and Sam

From left: Jane Tucker, Anne Giblin, and MBL research assistant Sam Kelsey. Credit: William “Mac” Lee

Anne Giblin “speaks ” biogeochemistry, thermodynamics, biology, physical chemistry–really, all the “hard” sciences–as a first language. They seem to be part of her innate intelligence. But she is not a desk scientist. She loves to be in the lab, or even better, out in the field conducting experiments or collecting samples.

Adverse field conditions are Anne’s forte! She is not stopped by freezing temperatures or clouds of mosquitoes on the North Slope of Alaska, nor by tropical heat, “no-see-ums,” or scorpion stings in Panama. She does not let little things like utter darkness in the cold depths of Adirondack lakes or a blanket of sewage sludge on the bottom of Boston Harbor dampen her enthusiasm for collecting more mud and adding dives to her SCUBA log. She does not send her students or employees out to do this work for her: she jumps in first. She does all of this to keep adding pieces to the scientific puzzle of element cycling in sediments, particularly with respect to nitrogen, carbon, and her first love, sulfur.

Anne Giblin at Liquid Jungle Lab

Anne Giblin at the Liquid Jungle Lab in Panama. Credit: Jane Tucker

Hard work is often matched by good cheer. A long day in the marsh with Anne leading the Plum Island Ecosystem-LTER team, in itself fun, is routinely followed by a good meal (often prepared by Anne), a good local brew (often provided by Anne), and good stories (often told by Anne). Over the years, these days and stories and Anne’s optimism have become encapsulated by some memorable lines, now used affectionately by the team. Three of the classics are, “Done by noon!” (as in, “It won’t take long, we’ll be ….”); “That’s not thunder, those are jets!” (at next occurrence, accompanied by a bright flash of light); and “No herics!” (i.e. heroics. I mentioned Anne’s first language is science, not English, didn’t I? It’s really the only thing I can help her with!)

Sure, Anne has the necessary stats on her CV that attest to her accomplishments as a scientist. But the best testament to her success may be that, in an increasingly difficult funding climate, and at an all soft-money research laboratory, Anne has kept herself and her team funded for over 25 years. It is tribute to Anne as a mentor, colleague, and friend that we have all wanted to stay.

The Plum Island Ecosystem-Long Term Ecological Research project and the TIDE Project are funded by the National Science Foundation.

Anne Giblin diving in Boston Harbor

Anne Giblin and Sam Kelsey diving in Boston Harbor.

 

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