MBL


Tom Delmont, a postdoctoral scientist in the Bay Paul Center, traveled on an icebreaker to the Southern Ocean (the recently named ocean that includes the Earth’s southernmost waters) to explore microbial interactions and primary productivity. His trip yielded contributions to a recent paper in PNAS as well as a peaceful video reflecting the beauty of the Austral Summer.

A surge of adrenaline is carrying Rae Nishi of University of Vermont to her new position as the Burroughs Wellcome Director of Education at MBL, effective January 1. She writes:

“Normally, by the time I hit mile 4.0 of my 5.2 mile weekend run, I am feeling my aches and pains and wondering whether I will be able to finish; however, the day after I accepted the offer to be director of education at MBL, I felt different. I was running with my head up and a smile on my face. I maintained speed on the uphill portions and even managed to sprint the last 100 yards. That pretty much embodies my feelings about my new job. I am optimistic, energetic, and willing to push hard. I am very much looking forward to working with all the great people who are at MBL.”

Looking forward to your arrival, Dr. Nishi!

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The magnificent research vessel Sorcerer II, owned by the J. Craig Venter Institute, arrived in Woods Hole this morning and picked up two scientists before setting out for the Gulf of Maine. They are Erik Zettler of Sea Education Association (SEA) and Keven Dooley, a SEA Semester alumnus and 2014 summer research intern at the MBL from Colorado College. The two scientists, along with the MBL’s Linda Amaral-Zettler, are collaborators on a project to discover and describe the microbial communities that live on microscopic bits of plastic debris in the ocean (known as the Plastisphere). They will be taking samples from the Gulf as well as conducting experiments during the cruise. The chief scientist on board is Amaral-Zettler’s colleague Chris Dupont, Assistant Professor in the Microbial and Environmental Genomics department at the J. Craig Venter Institute.

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In “A Tribute to Oliver Sacks” today on NPR’s “Science Friday” program, MBL Senior Scientist Roger Hanlon will be among the guests sharing memories of the famed neurologist, author, and polymath, who passed away last week. Sacks was a friend of Hanlon’s, a colleague in the study of sensory and behavioral biology, and “a lover of cephalopods (squid, octopus, and cuttlefish),” says Hanlon, whose studies these neurologically complex marine animals. Other of Sacks’ colleagues who will appear on the show include 2000 Nobel Prize Laureate Eric Kandel, University Professor at Columbia University and former MBL visiting investigator and faculty member in several neuroscience courses; and Sue Barry, Professor of Biological Sciences at Mt. Holyoke College and former director of the Grass Laboratory at MBL.

In Woods Hole, “Science Friday” will broadcast at 90.1 FM (WCAI) from 2:25 to 2:55 PM.

MBL Senior Scientist Roger Hanlon, left, and the late Oliver Sacks, also a squid fan, in 2005.

MBL Senior Scientist Roger Hanlon, left, and the late Oliver Sacks, also a squid fan, in 2005.

 

For a young scientist, Hari Shroff, co-director of the Optical Microscopy and Imaging course at MBL, has seen his share of career peaks. Shroff entered the University of Washington at age 14 and graduated when many people are just starting college. After completing his doctorate in biophysics in 2006 at the University of California, Berkeley, Shroff took the MBL Physiology course. It had “a huge influence on me,” Shroff says in this interview with Prashant Prabhat of Semrock. “I was working hand-in-hand with a lot of the experts in cell biology,” Shroff recalls, and they drove home how fundamental microscopy is to their field.

That same year, Shroff heard microscope developer Eric Betzig give a talk at Berkeley. “I have always been very fascinated by the fundamental mismatch in size between what a biologist wants to see and what they actually can see,” Shroff tells Prabhat. “[Betzig] was talking a little bit about super-resolution, and I wanted to drop what I was doing and immediately work for him.” Shroff felt lucky to become one of Betzig’s first hires at his lab at Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s newly opened Janelia Research Campus.

Shroff came back to the MBL Physiology course in 2007 as a teaching assistant, along with Betzig as visiting faculty. And there was important cargo in their van when they drove to Woods Hole: the super-resolution microscope Betzig and colleagues had invented, called PALM (photoactivated localization microscopy), which Shroff had a hand in developing. The scope’s power to visualize individual molecules at nanometer resolution bowled over the Physiology course participants and soon became the talk of the MBL campus.

“Those were very heady, exciting times, but also sleepless times,” Shroff tells Prabhat. “Something very special happens [at the MBL] during the summer when you have these world-class scientists congregating for a couple of months. You end up with these collisions which are just difficult to have otherwise. People have this kind of ‘can do’ attitude about science, and it’s also a great place for microscopy because some of the world’s best microscopists usually hang out there during the summers.”

Hari Shroff of the NIH shows MBL Neurobiology course students the light-sheet microscope he built (diSPIM). Credit: Tom Kleindinst

Hari Shroff of the NIH shows MBL students the light-sheet microscope he built (diSPIM). Credit: Tom Kleindinst

Important applications of Betzig’s microscope came out of that Physiology course session, which was led by course co-director Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz of the NIH, an early collaborator with Betzig on PALM. These included live-cell, single particle tracking (sptPALM), which Betzig says “has become one of the most useful and biologically informative applications of the technology. That idea was born while we were waiting for a ferry ride in Woods Hole.” They also figured out how to label two colors of photo-activatable probes (double-color PALM) during the course, which Shroff et al published later that year.

In 2014, Betzig won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his contributions to super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Shroff, meanwhile, had become a section chief at the NIH’s National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Engineering. He was also invited to co-direct the Optical Microscopy and Imaging course, where he shows students how to build a microscope from scratch, among other challenges. The course is a lot of work, Shroff says, but “definitely fun. I actually get some of my best ideas just from daydreaming and talking to students.”

 

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