From Kathiann M. Kowalski

The Environmental Fellows in the MBL’s Logan Science Journalism Program have returned to Woods Hole after two full and exhausting days of field work at the Harvard Forest. Besides being an incredible living laboratory for lots of ecological research, Harvard Forest is a place of great beauty. The view of the hemlock forest canopy was especially breathtaking.

Hemlocks in Harvard Forest. Photo by KM Kowalski

Sadly, Harvard Forest Director David Foster reports, most of the hemlocks there may be dead in as little as ten years. Hemlock wooly adelgid infestation will drastically change the face of the forest.

Closer to ground, our group took carbon dioxide readings from plots at the MBL’s heated soil experiment area. That experiment examines questions related to climate change.

We also took core samples from Black Gum Swamp. We want to see what organic material the sediments contain as we go deeper and further back in time.

Core sampling at Black Gum Swamp, Harvard Forest. Photo by KM Kowalski

Now we’re working with the core samples and data from our field work. We’ve heard the saying that even a bad day in the field beats a good day in the office, and I do miss the beauty and serenity of the majestic hemlocks and the rest of the trees.

On the other hand, it’s also fun trying to sift through the data so we can see what it tells us. And we’re looking forward to preparing our presentations for the end of the week. Now we just need Excel, PowerPoint, and the rest of our computer programs to cooperate.