Keating-at-OBFS-NML-meeting-9-2014-cropU.S. Representative Bill Keating visited Lillie Auditorium this morning to address members of the Organization of Biological Field Stations (OBFS) and the National Association of Marine Laboratories (NAML), who are holding a joint meeting at the MBL.

Keating remarked on the exponential advances in information technology that allow scientists to transmit data from field stations “instantly, accurately, and efficiently.” He also commended the two groups for collaborating. “Working jointly, with the information you gather, creates enormous opportunities” in the private sector as well as in environmental science, Keating said.

Keating represents the 9th district of Massachusetts, which includes Cape Cod and the islands. He was invited to the MBL by Sarah Oktay, president of OBFS and director of the UMass Boston Nantucket Field Station. MBL Senior Scientist Alan Kuzirian is the founding secretary/treasurer of NAML ( from 1990-2014).

Joe DeGiorgis, assistant professor of biology at Providence College, brought four undergraduates to the MBL last summer to conduct research on the squid–a star model system of neurobiology. The experience was “incredibly enriching,” said one undergraduate. “You can’t do any better than this.” DeGiorgis is also adjunct faculty in the MBL’s Cellular Dynamics Program. Read more here.

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Eye of the North Atlantic long-finned squid (Doryteuthis pealei). Credit: Joseph DeGiorgis

The MBL Activities Committee and Sodexo hosted a lively and tasty “Pulled Pork BBQ” this week in the MBL Quadrangle. The main event was a pie-making contest, which also provided the fast-disappearing desserts. Congratulations to the winning bakers (pictured in the last photo in the slideshow): Diane Cook, Suzanne Thomas, and Lisa Hunt. And thanks to all who baked, judged, served, helped out, and ate!

 

The MBL’s Anne Giblin and colleagues are watching how the salt marshes in the Plum Island Estuary in northern Massachusetts are bearing up as the climate warms, sea level rises, and coastal development stresses their ecological integrity. A senior scientist in the MBL Ecosystems Center, Giblin directs the multi-institutional Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) project at Plum Island, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

This video was produced at the NSF as part of the “Science Nation” video series, which is distributed to media outlets and K-12 content distributors throughout the world. For more information on “Science Nation,” please contact Laurie Modena Howell: lhowell@associates.nsf.gov.

 

Anne Glblin (center) at Plum Island Estuary with former MBL Semester in Environmental Science students Austin Ritter (L) and David Dodge.

Anne Glblin (center) at Plum Island Estuary with former MBL Semester in Environmental Science students Austin Ritter (L) and David Dodge.

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Contact:
Cheryl Dybas, NSF, (703) 292-7734, cdybas@nsf.gov

WOODS HOLE, Mass.–For decades, doctors have developed methods to diagnose how different types of cells and systems in the body are functioning. Now a team of scientists has adapted an emerging biomedical technique to study the vast body of the ocean.

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