Kristin Gribble, assistant research scientist in the MBL’s Bay Paul Center, was awarded the “Runner-Up Best Paper Prize 2014” by the journal Aging Cell and the Council of the Anatomical Society. The award recognizes her paper, “Maternal caloric restriction partially rescues the deleterious effects of advanced maternal age on offspring” (Gribble K.E., G. Jarvis, M. Bock and D.B. Mark Welch Aging Cell 13: 623-630, 2014).

Gribble and colleagues discovered that advanced maternal age reduces the lifespan, fecundity, and size of offspring in the rotifer (B. manjavacas), a tiny aquatic animal that is becoming established as a model organism for aging research. However, the researchers were able to reduce the severity of some of these effects by putting the mothers on a calorie-restricted diet. More information is here.


By Hunt Willard
MBL President and Director

It’s now been five days since the tragic earthquake struck Nepal. The official death toll has passed 5,000, but this doesn’t begin to tell the story of devastation in Nepal and neighboring regions of China and India that has affected millions of people in the region, wiped out entire villages, and destroyed ancient landmarks of cultural, religious and historic significance.

Kathmandu Valley, April 25. Credit: UNDP Nepal

Kathmandu Valley, April 25. Credit: UNDP Nepal

From the other side of the world, where we finally welcome spring to Woods Hole, it is difficult to grasp the scope of this disaster and the scale of suffering. This is why we tend to focus on specific events or images – the video of avalanches on Mt. Everest, or the neurosurgeon/journalist Sanjay Gupta performing brain surgery on an injured child, or a woman in Kathmandu who was pulled alive from the rubble, 36 hours after her 5-story apartment building came crashing down on top of her. Those images help us stay connected to the story, but ultimately fail to convey the massive scale of suffering, when three stories so quickly blur to become 3,000 and then 3 million.

Science – no less than the world around us – is increasingly a global enterprise. This is especially so at the MBL, where we regularly welcome scientists, staff, students and visitors from around the world.

And this is why we should pause – even for just a moment – to think about our colleagues and friends, some of whom, even unknown to us, have relatives, extended family members, classmates or neighbors who come from Nepal and the regions so affected by this tragedy. Today, we can all be Nepalese, and they can all be part of the MBL community.

Thank you for your thoughts and for what you do.



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By Diana Kenney

The startling discovery of a contagious cancer in steamer clams, published this week in the journal Cell, had its origins at the MBL.

Carol Reinisch began studying a fatal, leukemia-like disease of soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) at the MBL in the mid-1970s, when it was causing major die-offs among distinct bivalve populations. This week, scientists announced that the disease is a contagious form of cancer that has been transmitted between clam populations from New York to Prince Edward Island, Canada. The study was conducted by Michael Metzger and Stephen P. Goff of Columbia University, Jim Sherry of Environment Canada, and Reinisch.

The soft-shell "steamer" clam, Mya arenaria. Photo by Scott Bennett, MBL

The soft-shell “steamer” clam, Mya arenaria. Photo by Scott Bennett, MBL

Infectious cancer (or “super metastasis”) is known in only two other instances in nature: as a venereal disease in dogs and as a facial tumor in Tasmanian devils, according to an article about the clam leukemia in Science.

Reinisch, a few years ago, thought the clam disease might be caused by a virus, and she brought it to Goff’s attention. Metzger and Goff, she says, “conducted the truly elegant molecular biology to show the cancer is externally derived.”

Through genetic analysis of numerous sick clams, the team showed that while their cancer cells were nearly identical, the cancer cells did not match the genomes of their host clams. This indicates the cancer cells likely descended from a single, original clam cell “gone rogue,” which then multiplied and spread to nearby clams. How the disease was transmitted is still unknown.

Steamer clams are eaten by human beings and are an important commercial fishery. However, researchers say there is no health risk to humans who eat diseased clams. “Nobody eats them raw. When you steam or boil them, it kills all the cells,” Reinisch says.

Reinisch has studied this clam and bivalve disease for decades because “it’s one of the best and unique models of carcinogenesis in nature that we have,” she says. She carried out research at MBL for more than 30 years, first as a Whitman summer investigator and then, from 1998 to 2005, as a year-round scientist. She moved her lab to the MBL in order to explore Mya arenaria as a model system for cancer. Formerly, she was a Department Chair of Comparative Medicine at Tufts Veterinary School.

Reinisch’s earlier work indicated that the spread of the clam leukemia has an environmental component. “For whatever reason, the [cancer] transmission seems to be easier in stressed areas,” she says. “When we used to collect clams in New Bedford, Mass., we knew exactly where to find the ones with leukemia. The clams in a PCB contaminated site were much more liable to have the disease.”

Currently, Reinisch collaborates with Environment Canada in Burlington, Ontario, and is identifying the range of this transmissible cancer. She has studied bivalves as far north as Alaska and the Arctic and hopes to conduct field research in Antarctica in the coming year.


Metzger, MJ, Reinisch C, Sherry J, and Goff SP (2015) Horizontal transmission of clonal cancer cells causes leukemia in soft-shell clams. Cell 161: 255-263.


The Oosight(R) product line of microscopes, developed at the MBL  and commercialized by Cambridge Research & Instrumentation, Inc. (CRi), has been acquired by Hamilton Thorne, Ltd., a provider of precision laser devices and image analysis systems for the fertility, stem cell, and developmental biology research markets.

Widely used in fertility clinics to assess the health of unfertilized eggs (oocytes), the Oosight system provides live, high-contrast images and captures quantitative data on important oocyte structures using a patented, non-invasive, polarized-light technique. The technology was developed at the MBL by Rudolf Oldenbourg, Michael Shribak and colleagues in the 1990s and 2000s and commercialized by CRi as LC-PolScope(TM) technology. The Oosight system’s visualization capabilities have enabled breakthroughs in assisted reproductive technology, stem cell generation, and developmental biology research.

Visualization of the meiotic spindle in a rhesus monkey oocyte (egg) using the OosightTM spindle imaging system during enucleation. The spindle is near the 12 o'clock position in the egg. Credit: From Byrne, et al. 2007. Nature 450: 497-502 (Supplementary Material).

Visualization of the meiotic spindle in a rhesus monkey egg using the Oosight spindle imaging system during enucleation. The spindle is near the 12 o’clock position in the egg. Credit: Byrne et al (2007) Producing primate embryonic stem cells by somatic cell nuclear transfer. Nature 450: 497-502.

“The Oosight system is a unique instrument that is complementary to our laser products in both fertility and developmental biology research labs,” remarked David Wolf, President and CEO of Hamilton Thorne. “As a long-term distributor of the Oosight system we have already completed the technical integration of the Oosight with our laser products. We believe that by leveraging our established, world-wide sales channels and investing in product marketing, we can generate incremental sales of the Oosight product.”

Additional information on the Oosight product and its multiple applications can be found at



The Ecosystems Center will celebrate its 40th anniversary on June 5 and 6, 2015 at MBL.

The celebration will start with keynote talk on Friday evening, June 5, by John Holdren, Science Advisor to President Barack Obama.

A morning session on June 6 will feature invited talks on leading topics in ecosystem ecology and environmental science by people whose careers have been influenced by the Ecosystems Center. Speakers will include former Ecosystems Center Director John Hobbie, Carrie McCalley (former Semester in Environmental Science student), Breck Bowden (former graduate student and research assistant), Gillian Galford (former Brown-MBL PhD student), David Hooper (former research assistant), Suzanne Tank (former postdoc), and Angela Posada-Swafford (alumna of and advisor to the Logan Science Journalism Program).

In an afternoon session on Saturday, distinguished scientists William Schlesinger (Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies), Jerry Melillo (MBL), Penny Chisholm (MIT) and Ian Foster (University of Chicago) will present ideas about the future of ecosystem ecology and global change science in short talks and a moderated panel discussion.

All events will be held in MBL’s Lillie Auditorium and are open to the public.

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